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20120901
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll get to that the first example is the one of rwanda. i tell the rwanda story first all. it's the most clear picture that we get about how mass media can be so effective. one radio station that would disseminating these kinds of messages. it flipped to society. all societies have ranker. and societies have a -- [inaudible] but how do you get a brother to kill a brother? or how do you get a husband to kale wife in the name of -- to kill a wife in the name of some cause. or doctors to kill their patients or teachers to kill their students? set them all on fire? that's a hard task. and it wasn't unique to rwanda that people who were turning on each other and turning each other in. it was in bosnia, best men at each other's weddings. families breaking up because there were intermanages in these indications. i meant to turn my time on, i didn't. i'm going to do that right now. oops. so what happens in genocide situation? it's not media alone, obviously. there's always a crisis situation, right? but crises can be resolved and cooperative ways. they don't always mean that you're going turn on
to be careful not to use it as an alibi. really, when we talk of the failures of somalia, rwanda, bosnia, and i tried to explain the unwillingness of government and troops -- we made mistakes. we could have done things differently. in the investigations that i had gone to do on rwanda and rwanda in particular said that the only reason for failure was lack of will to act a day when we look at this, since we also have to consider context and taking enough time to answer your question because i think it's important -- and somalia where president bush's father sent in thousands of soldiers to feed hungry samoans, it was an incredible and noble initiative. he did it at the time of the elections and he was leaving office, but he took that decision and the soldiers went in and did whatever they could. of course, this mollies were fighting in unresisting, and sometimes you have food in warehouses, but you couldn't get it to the people. so they came in and broke up that locked down so that we could feed the people. and then they threw in the operation, black hawk was shut down and the u.s. relinquished
really when we talk of the failures of somalia, of rwanda, of boss bosnia, and try to explain in the book the difficulties we have, the unwillingness of governments. we made mistakes. we could have done things differently. but in the investigations that i have done on rwanda and also bosnia and rwanda in particular said there was a reason for failure was lack of will to act and change. and i think when we look at these, we have to consider context. i'm taking a tough time to answer your question. i think it's important that the in somalia, where the president bush's father sent in thousands of soldiers to feed hungry somalis, it was an incredible noble initiative. he it it at the time of the elections. and the soldiers went in and did whatever they could. of course, the somalis were fight and resisting and sometimes you had food in warehouses, but you couldn't get to the people. they came in and broke up that lock jam so that we can feed the people. and then they -- the operation [inaudible] and u.s. troops. but the troops which lead somalia were not just the u.s. troops, almost every wes
'll get to some of that with an example, the first example i'll give is the one of rwanda. i tell the story first off it's the most clear picture that we get about how mas media can be so effective. it was one radio station that would deseminating these kind of messages, and it flipped a society. all societies have ranker and all societies have a little bit of conflict. but how do you get a brother to kill a brother? how do you gate husband to kill a wife in the name of some cause? or doctors to kill their parents? or teachers to kill their students? set them all on fire. that's a hard task, and it wasn't unique to rwanda people who were friends were turning on each other and turning each other in. it was in bosnia, best men at each other's weddings, families breaking up because there were intermarriages in all of these cases. i meant to turn my time on, and i didn't. i'm going to do that right now. oops. so what happens in genocide situations? it's not media alone, obviously within there's a crisis situation. right. bring crises can be resolved and cooperative ways. they don't al
that they had been watching it somalia. >> guest: that's correct. it back a lot of the fighters in rwanda tolar peacekeeping information those that we watch cnn . they killed ten dozen soldiers in the belgian. ahead they give instructions to the soldiers to protect only themselves. the commander was left with several water bed to do his work with a whole nation of flame and the systematic genocide to a gun . some governments claim they did not know what was happening. i ask what they do when they found that it was happening? they said ten planes to evacuate their nationals and allowed the war to continue. in the end we blame the u.n. we only to find a better way. of course somalia, rwanda, bosnia, experiences. that was one of the reasons why i felt as international community we need to find a way of tackling these crisis, and that led to the responsibility to protect. >> host: talk will bit more. we have an extraordinary count in the book in january of 1994. receiving a cable from an informant who basically told you exactly what was born to happen, and it did happen. so the idea that things tak
. we had to close it down. this was end of '93. and beginning of '94, spring '94, we had rwanda. when governments go through this experience, they become risk adverse. nobody was ready to send in additional troops into these situations. >> host: you write in the book that in rwanda they had been watching somalia. >> guest: that's correct. in fact one of the -- in somalia and rwanda, told our peacekeeping information, we also watch the cnn, and there was something similar. they killed 10 belgian soldiers and the belgian battalion was withdrawn, and the she lankons gave instructions to their soldiers to only protect themselves so the commander was left with several hundred men to do his work, with the whole nation in a systemic genocide going on. but we couldn't get the troops. some governments claim they did not know it was happening. but then i ask them, what did they do when they found out it was happening? they september -- sent in planes, and in order to continue, but in the end we blame the u.n., we all need to find a better way of tackling these, and of course somalia, rwanda, bo
really when we talk of the failures of somalia, of rwanda, of bosnia, and i try to state in the book the difficulties we have, we made mistakes in the secretary of. we could have done things differently, but in the investigations that i have done on rwanda and also lost me at and were wanted in particular the overwhelming reason for failure is lack of will to act and to intervene i'm taking time to answer questions because i believe in somalia when president bush's father went in, thousands of soldiers -- hungry somalis. he did it at the time of the elections. the soldiers went in and did whatever they could and of course the somalis were resisting and sometimes you have food and warehouses but you couldn't get it to the people so they came and broke the logjam so we could feed people. and then they had thrown in the operation, the blackhawk showdown and we withdrew the troops but the true's which left somalia were not just the u.s. troops. almost every western government went through their troops so the best armed troops in somalia in the end collapse and we had to close it down. th
than good? there must be better solutions to. >> sticky person in rwanda -- take the person in rwanda. the pledges meaningless. the target is ridiculous. it encourages governments to get it signed off to the target was made up in the 1960's based on figures from the 1940's. when the u.n. look at these figures and said it should be served. 4%. -- 0.4%. >> in a sense it does not matter. it is the policy. i do not believe it is about that but i understand the argument. it is a policy of all three major parties of the last election and so what is happening now is the enactment of democracy. when you go out and talk to the public -- just a year ago, when people were asked the question in a fair way, not, given the recession, can we possibly afford -- >> that was some time ago. support is falling. these millionaires are not paying their fault amount of tax. and they want them to spend money that does not work. they have been shown not to work. >> the same amount of money was to -- page to disasters, you would not have a problem? >> when you have a disaster, it causes chaos on the ground. gr
he decided to do a documentary. you were thinking about rwanda. guest: do not all think about that when we are sitting around our couch? it was an event like to put my finger on exactly. it was a saturday night. you watch a movie. i was watching "bowling for columbine." michael more and i have very different political views. i always looked at him as a significant figure. he makes something i want to see. i was watching the movie. i had seen it before. for some reason i was thinking about rwanda. thinking, here is a genocide that happened, not in the olden days, it happened while i was working. i said, there is one going on right now. as i sit here, in my comfortable apartment in manhattan, there are people who are running for their lives in terror. i said, how can this be in our day and age? i thought to myself, as a society, we are so much better off than almost every way imaginable. you look at the availability of food, medicine, in almost every way we are better off. the one way we are not is security. we are probably more insecure than we were before. i thought, whose job
thinking about rwanda, not necessarily a light subject. guest: don't we sit around thinking about that on the couch, by the tv? it was definitely an event i could put the finger on exactly the moment where this triggered in my mind, and it was a saturday night, i got kids, you sit home, you watch movies and i was watching the miking the michael moore movie "bowling for columbine". michael and i have different political views, i look at him as a sit film in documentary -- person in documentary phillips, they are interesting, fury -- funny, those are the kinds i wanted to see. i was watching the movie, drifting off, i was thinking about rwanda and thinking about here is a genocide that happened not like in the olden days that you read in history books, it happened while i was working, and i said get that, there's one going on right now, as i sit here, you know, in my comfortable apartment in manhattan, there are people who are running for their lives in terror. and i said how can this be in our day and age, and i thought to myself, you know, in society, we're so much better off, in
rwanda to do and i would like to go out there and visit them. i signed off last year in 2011 the urban agriculture " ordinance. the ordinance for us was another reflection of city policy with the board of supervisors that we wanted to increase the opportunities for folks to grow crops. to grow agriculture, to be able to sell it if they so wish to to so we could have folks that already have that experience, but not necessarily at the corporate level. our urban agriculture is important to us. we have identified a number of abandoned lots all over the city and we would love to again excite volunteers and people who are interested in urban agriculture and the ability to distribute fresh produce to people who are in need. allow that to happen, working with our school district to see what can happen on their lots so the urban agriculture ordinance is something that you might want to take a look at. and finally, with our recreation and park department, the community gardens program, another broad program we have. taking lots, whether they are a few hundred square feet or thousands of square f
can't tell you why. i started thinking about the u.n. and bias against urz. failure to stop rwanda and sudan. i need to do something. i saw this michael moore engage ago medium. this is the need potassium i wanted to express my point of view. i started raising money and put the movie together. >> it was remarkable to see almost a sort of clueless attitude on the part of people at the u.n. that never could really define what it is they do because they don't do anything. they never condemn acts of genocide or even condemn their own corruption. what is going on? >> they don't have any backbone. when it comes down to it they are trying to protect their own back sides. why would you want to define terrorism if half your membership is terrorist states? they don't want to call out their own members. they are artful and never passing judgment. that is their thing. they never wanted to pass judgment. they don't want to have a standard. because of that, it's completely hopeless. >> mahmoud ahmadinejad complete nut job. they give him a forum at united nations. he goes in and talks openly to r
diplomacy but also fiercely criticized for failing to stop the bloodshed in rwanda, bosnia, and most recently in syria. in his new book former u.n. secretary general kofi annan attempts to shape how history will remember his 40 years at the united nations. >> well, i hope that it will be said that he made a contribution. >> reporter: his name will forever be attached to some of the darkest chapters in the u.n. history. he was the head of u.n. peace keeping forces when some 800,000 people were killed in rwanda. the next year more than 8,000 bosnian men and boys were slaughtered in a place designated a so-called u.n. safe area. you said with regards to rwanda and bosnia, we patently failed or were seen to have failed. do you believe you failed. >> of course we failed. not only do i apologize on behalf of the u.n. and on my own behalf. >> reporter: annan writes that the experiences of rwanda and bosnia pushed him to try to shape the into an organization that would, quote, step up rather than standby. >> we've ber veened to make life easier for people living with h.i.v./aids. in the case
, rwanda, and senegal. there are even bright spots in the reduction of graph and corruption. ghana, south africa, namibia, rwanda, and botswana each has less corruption, gets this, than italy and greece according to transparency international. governance is improving in many countries. terrorism by islamic extremists remains, but there is progress here as well. having largely driven the al qaeda-linked al shabab from mogadishu, the capital, the city is experiencing the longest period of relative peace since 1991. jeff gettleman, "the new york times'" east africa bureau chief is a frequent visitor to mogadishu. he told me that visitors to mogadishu's airport were until recently asked to list on their arrival form the caliber of their weapon. now they are asked the purpose of their visit, including if it's a holiday. behind much of this growth and improvement lies the global demand for commodities. with large shares of the world's oil, gold, and rare minerals, africa has been an attractive source of raw material for emerging nations. and none more so than china. while the rest of the world
operations of its 90s. rwanda and bosnia. >> rose: you view that as a mistake. >> and iraq. not as a mistake as such, but it was our failure. our failure in the sense that we couldn't help or do as much as we could to protect the people. and often they say it's the u.n.'s fault or they didn't give-- but as i explaiin the book, the u.n. has no standing army. we need to rely on governments to give us the troops we want. we often go in lightly armed with lightly armed troops. and we ourselves have to the been able to lower expectation and explain to the people what we are there for. so sometimes they would expect a couple of battalions of the u.n. to do incredible things, you know. i mean and when the failure comes, our member states don't speak up, you know. it's the organization, the seretary-general and the team and i try to explain to people that there are two u.n.s. the u.n. made up of member states who give us the mandate and the secretariat that implements it. and we can be as the organization can be as strong as the member states want it to be. and in both situations, we didn't have eno
in rwanda. now she goes to ethiopia and eulogizes the worst human rights abuser in africa. how can the united states to preach about human rights when their own ambassador are telling the world that -- it is a disgrace. i wish barack obama tells this woman that she is not representing the united states in the united nations. thank you very much. guest: thank you very much for that. i have to frame my answer with a disclaimer or a caveat. i have no susan rice since i was 12 years old. she was a year ahead of me at the girls' junior or senior high school across the way, growing up in washington, and she has been a friend of mine for quite some time. my sense -- trying to be a little dispassionate. my sense is that she has been a very effective u.n. ambassador. no question that she -- and she will admit it and committed a publicly -- she feels a tremendous burden about the situation in rwanda. in 1994, she was 30 years old. i believe she was at the national security council at the time before becoming assistant secretary of state for african affairs. she, along with many in the clinto
rules said the rwanda to go. the bad teachers you can't get rid of. the teachers that are not doing a good job you can't get rid of if you can get rid of the bottom 10%, you can make our education system, hour k-12 education system which more effective. also, why should we be going to school 170 to 180 days a year when many other countries are doing 220 and more hours per day. why can't you do it? teachers' unions won't let you. why can't you get good physics and math teachers? because you cannot pay the same for the physics and math teacher and that skill set is much more needed in the private sector. as you pay for physical english teacher i'm not besmirching them because for the english teachers' but in the private sector the skills but is not as in demand because they will allow you to. you can't reward the teachers with bonuses. they won't allow you to. you get paid by the number of degrees. these are union rules. these are not established for our children. they are not even established to do the best of the members. it's the best for growing the teachers' union. i love this qu
can't be optimistic about what happens in northern ireland or the middle east or rwanda, because we have so much to build on. and the basic outlines of the government that we possess and our civic religion as a people is such that potentially at least we could create a society that is the model for the world. it isn't right now. and that's one of the tragedies, i think, of our foreign policy and our domestic policies as played out over the last several years. [applause] >> so the book ends with me traveling back to africa. and retracing then the steps that my father took and my grandfather took. my grandfather as those of you who have read the book or will read the book will discover was actually the first african in his village and in his circle ever to meet a white person. and almost immediately he had to confront what it meant to be drawn from a 15th century world into the 20th century world in the span of a single lifetime, and the enormous contradictions that he had to grapple with he ended up passing on to my father, and those contradictions my father has then passed on to me.
of somalia, rwanda, bosnia. i tried to explain in the book the difficulties we have. we have some governments that give truth. we put our differences aside. in the investigations that i have done on rwanda and the report on bosnia and rwanda in particular, the overwhelming reason for failure was lack of will to act and change. and i think when we look at these things, we have to start to consider context. it's important. in somalia, president bush father thinking thousands of soldiers to feed hungry civilians. it was incredible initiative. it he was. they did whatever they could. of course sometimes you have food warehouses, but h
-- >> where you feel it the most? rwanda. extraordinary. >> how many countries did you -- >> we had a guide, eric, who was terrific. he lost his father, his lost his two sisters, his two brothers. it's like that almost across the country. you meet so many people in that part where it really is tremendously tough. >> are they on the way back? >> they are. if i was in -- that was the one thing i was going to tell you from the investment perspective. if ingd invest money in africa, you could feel it. >> really? >> i know the horrible stories. >> nairobi you could feel -- >> how many different countries? >> we were in rwanda, tanzania and kenya. but kenya briefly. >> if like a week from now there's a tape worm in me that i don't know where it came from, and it's like all wrapped around my ribs and eight feet long, i might -- >> was that from that hug earlier? >> i don't know. my feet are two feet -- and they go in between your toes. i'm afraid to even -- >> are you trying to out us on the air? >> no. >> playing footsy? >> i come down with anything weird -- >> i have to take malaron. >> for mala
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)